Saturday, April 04, 2009

Shameless Promotion of My Friends and Allies

Got to love Mark Shea.  Jolly dinner companion, able and artistic speaker, prodigious defender of Catholic things, great and small, and now, feature film actor.  Check out this link and then make plans to show this delightful movie.  I am anticipating this more than the summer movie run.

9 comments:

Fr. Erik Richtsteig said...

Hmmm, I thought Mark was opposed to torture.

Cathy_of_Alex said...

Blessed Easter to you, Father!

Anonymous said...

Fr.,
You are up for some blog awards at the Crescat (Carolina Cannonball).

AMDG,
Suzanne

Harold Frank said...

Is this a dead link? I couldn't find anything. I did look up Mark Shea in IMDb and it lead to "G.K. Chesterton: The Apostle of Common Sense", is that it? Father Thorpe, you should suggest that "Mark P. Shea" update his bio on www.IMDb.com

Dave said...

I understand this is an adaptation of Chesterton's novel, but is a torture scene the best trailer the producers could come up with? It's not even funny in a dark way, it's just sick (and poorly shot).

danielcox said...

Ummmmm....

This looks ... interesting.

Clapping my hands...

Semper Eadem said...

It would be nice if you could add our blog to your blogroll: www.catholicheritage.blogspot.com

Margaret Baron said...

Torture? Are you guys serious or just trolling? Being forced to sing a ditty at gunpoint could only be considered torture in the very broadest use of the term.

In this particular case it most certainly is not. Is Smith extracting information or wantonly inflicting pain? Perhaps some context would help http://www.cse.dmu.ac.uk/~mward/gkc/books/manalive/man_pt2_1.html

Find out what's really going on before jumping to conclusions.

Margaret Baron said...

I must admit, I'm rather disappointed with the scene. In the novel the professor is dangling outside the window. His ability to see the world is a key element of the narrative. Also instead of "If your happy and you know it", one of the more inane dittys every conceived, he actually sings:

"`I thank the goodness and the grace
That on my birth have smiled.
And perched me on this curious place,
A happy English child.'"

Sigh. I guess I'll see it anyway, but this is why I prefer books.